Sunday, May 04, 2014

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and talented adolescents: Feeling Boys and Thinking Girls: Talented Adolescents and Their Teachers

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and talented adolescents: FEELING BOYS AND THINKING GIRLS: TALENTED ADOLESCENTS AND THEIR TEACHERS

Jane Piirto, Ph.D. (ENTP)

This article appeared in the Proceedings of the CAPT conference in Orlando, Florida in March 1998

ABSTRACT

"The MBTI was administered to 226 tenth and eleventh graders who qualified as gifted and talented. Sixty teachers of the talented and 25 elementary and high school teachers were also administered the MBTI. Talented teens preferred ENFP. Gender differences were calculated as well among artistic youth and academically talented youth. Male artistic youth preferred F and academic females preferred T. Teachers of the talented preferred ENFJ. Other teachers preferred ESFJ. Implications for teaching these students are discussed.

"The MBTI has been widely used in education, and a few studies have focused on differences between teachers’ preferences and the preferences of artistically and academically talented youth. Myers and McCaulley (1985) described studies of National Merit Finalists (INFP), of gifted seventh to ninth grade males (ENTP) and females (ENFP); of creative men (INTP) and creative women (INFP), and of schoolteachers (ESFJ). N’s received higher grades than S’s and J’s received higher grades than P’s. The MBTI has been found to be associated with academic aptitude: Myers and McCaulley said, "To the extent that academic work requires the ability to deal with concepts and ideas (I), and with symbols and abstractions (N), academic aptitude should be, and is, associated with a preference for introversion and intuition" (p. 123). Feeling types score higher when verbal strengths are called for, and Thinking types get higher scores when analysis is in order. Perceptive types have greater breadth of knowledge than J and usually score higher on aptitude tests. However, J types get higher grades than would be expected by their aptitude scores because they organize their work and meet deadlines." Continue reading: The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and talented adolescents: FEELING BOYS AND THINKING GIRLS: TALENTED ADOLESCENTS AND THEIR TEACHERS by Jane Piirto, Ph.D. Ashland University, March 1998